Psychosocial Flags

October 12, 2008 by   Print
Filed under Knee, Lumbar Spine

As one on the frontlines for 20 years the concept of “flags” was useful to provide a strategy for integrating multiple elements into patient management strategies. Unfortunately , much like pain management programs recognition has driven a hands off strategy of patient management on the basis that “manual therapy” is either ineffective or creates dependance in this patient group.

The converse view is that manual therapy and functionally specific rehabilitation can be used directly as a cognitive-behavioural strategy to address specific patient complaints / functional impairments. As physiotherapists we need to recognise that any interactions we have with patients have cognitive / emotive connotations and there is no practical reason why physical means cannot be used to facilitate this approach as an adjunct or an alternative to psychotherapy techniques

Those who attended the “Decade of the Flags” conference in Keel university at the end of 2007 will know that primary care clinicians can now no longer hide behind professional boundaries as an excuse not to challenge patients distorted beliefs or facilitate rehabilitation programs which are tailored to their needs.

This obviously poses clinical challenges but the facts won’t go away by passing the buck.

What do you find the most challenging aspects of of this situation?

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  1. […] On initial reflection our initial impression maybe that we cannot influence many of these variables because they are either outside our remit, outside our scope of practise or simply beyond our control.  Previous posts on this blog have referred  to psychosocial flags and extrapolated beyond the well known Red and Yellow flags to the more recently updated concept of Orange, Black and Blue flags.  If you are rusty on what those definitions refer too you can review them here and here. […]



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